. . . Help An Alcoholic?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes – You Can !!



  • ..

    alcohol_pic1 WARNING

    Alcoholics can be frustrating.

    While drinking or trying to get sober

    alcoholics may be baffling in their

    response to normal help.

    .

    Do you want to discover how to effectively help alcoholics

    • improve their life,
    • recover their health,
    • retain or regain their loved ones love,
    • restore earning ability, and
    • avoid conflict with the police

    by helping them get sober?

    ————————-o————————

    Alcoholics do not generally respond to normal help.

    ————————-o————————

    However, success is possible with a strategy that has proven results.

    This strategy is known as ‘Brief Twelve Step Facilitation’.

    Brief-TSF Cover2 Brief Twelve Step Facilitation; –

    • is a culmination of scientific research and experience gained over the last 70 years.
    • incorporates elements of cognitive behavioural therapy, motivational interviewing, twelve step facilitation and Alcoholics Anonymous.
    • intervention can be brief (just one hour) with support sessions as needed.
    • can be conducted by anyone who has interviewing or counselling skills
    • is an early intervention to prevent further degeneration
    • is an ultimate harm minimisation strategy 

    -

    ————————o————————

    You can start helping alcoholics for just USD$9.95.

    This e-book manual of 56 pages is in an easy to read language and format.

    ————————-o————————

    Alcoholics can get sober with your help or, They may continue drinking, be in denial, become angry, engage in domestic violence, break the law, become estranged, lose a job, get injured or become ill.

    Helpers may be happy to be of help or become disillusioned. What did I do wrong? Why won’t they stop drinking? How can I really help?

    Alcoholics themselves are usually in pain and frustrated. Why can’t I stop drinking? I have tried to get sober! Am I doomed by my drinking?

    ————————-o————————

    j0385417 Brief Twelve Step Facilitation is suitable for use by;

    • Doctors / Physicians
    • Psychologists
    • Psychiatrists
    • Social Workers
    • Nurses
    • Counsellors
    • Faith Based Therapists (e.g. Pastors, Ministers, Rabbis, Monks, brothers) and 
    • Trained volunteers
    • Students of all the above,
    • In fact anyone with interviewing skills and a little detachment

    Professionally Written Strategy

    Brief Twelve Step Facilitation is professionally written by Mr Robin Foote who has over 26 years experience working with alcoholics, drug addicts, compulsive gamblers and their families. Mr Foote’s qualifications include Bachelor of Arts (welfare), National Certified Addictions Counsellor and trained Twelve Step Facilitator.

    What is alcoholism?

    An alcoholic loses the will to consistently stop drinking when needed or wanted. They will also crave alcohol when not drinking and crave more alcohol even when drinking. They may also be in denial about their drinking and its effects on them.

    Regardless of the moral, medical, psychological or political issues about alcoholism, alcoholics are in dire straights and need appropriate and effective help.

    Effective help includes showing them how to;

    • develop a deep desire to stop drinking
    • accept responsibility for their health,
    • be a good spouse and/or parent,
    • partake in extended family life,
    • be a good employee or boss,
    • become a good citizen and community minded,
    • Obey and promote the law,

    ————————-o————————

    Obviously you are not responsible for other peoples actions.

    All you can do is point the way to sobriety.

    The Brief Twelve Step Facilitation presenter can do so without becoming frustrated.

    ————————-o————————

    alcoholicDestination without early help.

    Posted in Alcohol, Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholic, Alcoholism, Counsellor, Doctors, Faith Based, Heavy Drinker, Priests, Ministers, Pastors,, Professional Training, Psychiatrist, Psychologist, Therapist, Twelve Step Facilitation and tagged , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

    * * * * *

    Understanding Alcoholics Anonymous

    Understanding Alcoholics Anonymous : Results from a Survey in England and Wales

    A national survey indicates what is involved in “being a member” of Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) and provides data which should help medical practitioners to make better-informed judgments about whether to recommend A.A. to particular alcoholic patients.

    The survey shows that to be successful in A.A. entails;

    • attending meetings,
    • reading the literature,
    • office-holding,
    • twelfth-stepping (helping others with sobriety),
    • sponsorship, and
    • attending formal functions

    is routine for the great majority of current members.

    Members also make new friends in A.A. who replace rather than augment the circle of old ones and who form the basis for a new set of relationships outside the fellowship. These enable the A.A. programme to be carried beyond the meeting into the member’s everyday life and facilitate a continuity of concern which the caring professions cannot provide.

    The Lancet, Volume 311, Issue 8060, Pages 372-375, Stuart Henry and David Robinson

    -

    Posted in Alcohol, Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholic, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Medical Practitioner and tagged , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

    * * * * *

    Disease of Alcoholism

    Most significant possible long-term effects of...

    Image via Wikipedia

     

    The definition of alcoholism as defined by the American Society of Addiction Medicine and the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence:

    “Alcoholism is a primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations.

    The disease is often progressive and fatal,

    It is characterized by;

    • impaired control over drinking,
    • preoccupation with the drug alcohol,
    • use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and
    • distortions in thinking, most notably denial.

    Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic.”

    Posted in Alcohol, Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholic, Alcoholism, Help an Alcoholic and tagged , , , , , , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

    * * * * *

    The AA Experience

    Thinking businessman uid 1271528 The following is a list of statements made by an Alcoholics Anonymous member who is in recovery from alcoholism.

    1. I had tried before, and didn’t succeed. This time I really tried using AA as part of my Recovery Program. Although I was court-mandated; I listened; I learned; and I call it a blessing.

    2. …the biggest thing with me is my Spirituality in the Program. I believe strongly that my Higher Power, whom I call God, is the One who has given me sobriety…the reprieve…

    3. When I finally sat down and listened to others’ stories, it really was an awakening… I might actually be able to stay sober…

    4. I got a Sponsor… he didn’t take any flack… he didn’t feel sorry for me… he was actually very hard on me…

    5. …finally surrendering and doing what I was told to do (by my Sponsor) was a big help…

    6. The main thing for me is, waking up every morning sober, and thanking God… and working the Steps everyday of my life…

    7. I have a great support system, my Sponsor, a core of people in Recovery… I’m getting to know people… and trusting them has helped…

    8. My girl friend is in Recovery, and that helps… we call each other up on our Steps…

    9. Relationship with my Mom has gotten stronger…

    10. …my faith has become more and more believing… that God actually wants to see me do well.

    11. I had trouble all the time when I drank… getting beat up… trouble with the law, and wrecking cars…

    12. I had blackouts… where I didn’t even know what I did…

    13. …the biggest help for me from others is realizing I wasn’t alone… there was actually help… and I might actually be able to stay clean and sober…

    14. The main thing for me is, wakening up every morning sober, and thanking God for another day of sobriety…

    15. I get to know people… and learning to trust people…

    16. Developing my Spirituality gave me a reprieve from the compulsion to drink…

    17. My Mom has always been there for me… and now I relationship is stronger…

    18. I realize I didn’t have to do this Recovery alone… there is help…

    19. I learned to forgive myself and to stop beating up on myself… and now I know I have to be responsible for my own actions…

    20. To me, it’s not drinking one day at a time, and looking to get well… my problems came from the way I looked at myself… to find out what kept me there… hold on everyday and believe it can be done… staying sober and getting well.

    Posted in Alcohol, Alcoholic, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Help an Alcoholic and tagged , , , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

    * * * * *

    Affiliation with Alcoholics Anonymous

    STAGES OF AFFILIATION WITH ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS [i]

    People progress through stages of affiliation with others and with Alcoholics Anonymous in pursuit of solutions to their problems. Two paths are identified; Direct Affiliation and Facilitated Affiliation.

    The stages are not necessarily discrete where a person moves in clear progression from one stage to the next. A person is more likely to move up and down, sometimes jumping a stage in regression or progression.

    Facilitation plays a significant part in the process of AA affiliation as approximately 60% of AA members seek help from the helping professions prior to attending AA[ii].

    These stages are;

    • Pre-contemplation
    • Contemplation
    • Preparation
    • Non-affiliation
    • Affiliation
    • Misaffiliation
    • Affiliation-mandated
    • Supra-affiliation
    • Altruistic affiliation
    • Ambivalent affiliation
    • Disaffiliation
    • Re-affiliation

    [i] After, Kurtz, Linda Farris, Self-help and Support Groups: A Handbook for Practitioners. Sage Publications Inc. Thousand Oaks, CA, 1997, P 68.

    [ii] Alcoholics Anonymous 2001 Membership Survey, www.aa.org. And Alcoholics Anonymous (2002, 4th Edition) AAWS Inc, New York.

    Copyright © Robin Foote 2005-2011

    Download a PDF version of the complete chart;

    Posted in Alcoholic, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Twelve Step Facilitation and tagged , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

    * * * * *

    Denial – I’m No Alcoholic

    Denial George is an alcoholic, but he won’t admit it, and doesn’t think he needs to change.

    The thought has occurred to him more than once that he might be an alcoholic. His first marriage ended in divorce because his wife finally got to the point where she refused to put up with his drunkenness every weekend.

    She told George that she thought he needed help and suggested he find out about AA. Her suggestion just made George angry. “I’m no alcoholic,” he blustered. “I can take booze or leave it.”

    “Then why don’t you leave it?”

    George didn’t stay for an answer. He stalked out of the house and spent the rest of the evening in a bar.

    I can take it or leave it. True, to a point. George seldom drinks during the week — maybe a beer or two after work, but that’s all.

    He saves his real drinking for the weekends. Even then, he controls his drinking so that he can make it to work Monday morning-most of the time.

    He often feels tired and shaky, but so does everyone else after a wild weekend. That doesn’t mean he’s an alcoholic.

    In George’s mind, an alcoholic is someone who has to drink, a person really hooked on booze, who hides bottles and sees pink elephants and snakes, a bum who can’t hold a job. George isn’t like that at all.

    He admits he does get pretty drunk at times. Nothing unusual about that — all of his friends are heavy drinkers. He’s blacked out a few times, driven home and not been able to recall how he got there. Twice, George has landed in jail on drunk driving charges.

    One of the charges was reduced to reckless driving and he’d had to pay a large fine on his second DWI.

    Still, he insists he always drives carefully, even after drinking. “I’ve never had an accident,” he boasts.

    After his second conviction George told the judge, “I sure won’t let this happen again.”

    But that’s what he said after his first arrest.

    Denial Styles

    What’s with George? A couple of things, both related to his most successful and most self-defeating defense: denial.

    Denial takes two major forms; First, the alcoholic insists that he or she can drink like other people. Socially. Normally.

    This means that there are always ready excuses for the exceptional times-for the fights, the arrests, the blackouts, the hangovers. It’s someone else’s fault. It’s harassment, bad luck, or just too much pressure.

    Secondly, the alcoholic insists that he or she is different from “real” alcoholics. Drinking alcoholics are usually experts at picturing “real” alcoholics. They’re different somehow: jobless, homeless, friendless, and usually feeble-minded. Not like themselves at all.

    That’s why you’ll find, if you look far enough, that the scotch and water alcoholic looks down on the beer alcoholic, who, in turn, is disgusted by the wino.

    Each is convinced that he or she isn’t the “real” alcoholic.

    George’s drinking pattern displays only one kind of alcoholic pattern. There are many others, and they overlap and shade into each other.

    • The five o’clock alcoholic doesn’t take a drink until after work-never touches the stuff before five — then drinks continuously until passing out.
    • The periodic (or binge) alcoholic can go for long stretches of time without touching a drop. Then comes a binge that can last days or weeks or months.
    • The maintenance alcoholic finds ways to sip all day long, to keep just enough alcohol in the blood.

    In short, there is no “typical” alcoholic that serves as a standard by which other alcoholics are measured.

    The only thing they have in common is that, sooner or later, they all have serious life problems related to their drinking.

    Posted in Alcohol, Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholic, Alcoholism, Heavy Drinker and tagged , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

    * * * * *

    What do clients want from alcohol and other drug treatment services?

    This article presents findings from a study that examined the assistance aspirations of clients attending an outpatient alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment service.

    Key research questions were as follows:

    • What type(s) of assistance do clients want?
    • Do assistance aspirations vary by age, gender or ethnicity? and
    • Are assistance aspirations predictive of subsequent attendance duration?

    The study was set in an outpatient AOD treatment service located in Auckland, New Zealand. Data were collected from two client groups via a questionnaire (n = 109) and a semi-structured interview (n = 12). Questionnaire data were collected following the completion of the first attended appointment. Interview data were completed, on average, after participants had attended two treatment appointments (range 1–3).

    When asked to indicate the services they would most like to receive, from a list of 10 possible options, questionnaire participants most frequently selected the options

    • ‘talk to a professional about an AOD-related problem’ (71%),
    • ‘practical strategies for making/maintaining changes to AOD use’ (66%) and
    • ‘ongoing support while making/maintaining changes to AOD use’ (61%).

    These options were also the three most likely to be endorsed as the number one service type wanted. Binary regression analysis identified few between-group differences concerning the frequency with which each option was endorsed.

    The interview data were consistent with the questionnaire findings suggesting that, irrespective of age, gender, ethnicity and subsequent attendance duration, outpatient AOD treatment clients may share a common set of assistance aspirations at the point of service entry.

    What do clients want from alcohol and other drug treatment services? A mixed methods examination. 2011, Vol. 19, No. 3 , Pages 224-234 (doi:10.3109/16066359.2010.507893) Justin Pulford, Peter Adams, Janie Sheridan. Addiction Research & Theory

    Posted in Alcohol, Alcoholic, Professional Training, Therapist, Treatment, Twelve Step Facilitation and tagged , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

    * * * * *

    Fellowship and Social Confidence Help Sobriety

    Social contacts, self-confidence crucial to successful recovery through Alcoholics Anonymous

    Among the many ways that participation in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) helps its members stay sober, two appear to be most important –

    • spending more time with individuals who support efforts towards sobriety and
    • increased confidence in the ability to maintain abstinence in social situations.

    In a paper that will appear in the journal Addiction and has been released online, researchers report the first study to examine the relative importance to successful recovery of the behavior changes associated with participation in AA.

    “AA is the most commonly sought source of help for alcohol addiction and alcohol-related problems and has been shown to help people attain and maintain long-term recovery,” says study leader John F. Kelly, PhD. “This study is the first to investigate exactly how AA helps individuals recover by examining the independent effects of several mechanisms simultaneously.”

    In 1990, the current report’s authors note, the Institute of Medicine called for more research into exactly how AA helps its members.  While subsequent studies have documented the short- and long-term benefits of AA participation, only recently have researchers investigated how those benefits are conferred.  A broad range of factors associated with AA participation have been identified as contributing to recovery – including –

    • changes in social networks,
    • maintaining motivation,
    • confidence in the ability to cope with the demands of recovery,
    • decreased depression symptoms and
    • increased spirituality –

    but no study as yet has been able to determine the relative importance of those mechanisms.

    To meet that goal, the current study analyzed data from more than 1,700 study participants who had been enrolled at nine U.S. centers as part of a federally funded trial known as Project MATCH that compared three alcohol treatment approaches.  Almost 1,000 were recruited into the study directly from the community, and another 775 had received prior inpatient treatment, indicating a greater degree of alcohol dependence.  Along with the treatment approaches being tested in Project MATCH – cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational enhancement therapy, and Twelve Step Facilitation – participants were free to attend AA meetings.

    At follow-up sessions 3, 9 and 15 months after completing the Project MATCH therapies, participants received several assessments.  In addition to reporting their alcohol consumption – based on both the frequency and the intensity of recent drinking – attendance at AA meetings, and spiritual and religious practices, they also completed specialized assessments of confidence in their ability to remain abstinent in social situations and when experiencing unpleasant emotions, of their level of depression symptoms, and of whether their close social ties supported or discouraged their efforts to maintain abstinence.

    Overall results indicated that greater participation in AA during the first three months of the study period was independently associated with more successful recovery over the following year.

    Of the behavioral changes associated with AA attendance,

    • changes in social networks – more contacts with people who supported abstinence and fewer with those would encourage drinking – and
    • greater confidence in the ability to maintain sobriety in social situations were most strongly connected with recovery success
    • reduced depression and
    • increased spirituality or religious practices

    - had a significant independent role in the recovery of participants whose had received inpatient treatment and probably had been more seriously dependent on alcohol.

    “Our findings are shedding light on how AA helps people recover from addiction over time,” says Kelly.  “The results suggest that social context factors are key; the people who associate with individuals attempting to begin recovery can be crucial to their likelihood of success.  AA appears adept at facilitating and supporting those social changes.”

    From a press release at Massachusetts General Hospital

    Posted in Alcoholic, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Twelve Step Facilitation and tagged , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

    * * * * *

     

    WARNING

    .

    Alcoholics can be frustrating.

    While drinking or trying to get sober

    alcoholics may be baffling in their

    response to normal help.

    .

    .

    woman_holding_glass_of_wine

     

    Do you want to discover how to effectively help alcoholics

    • improve their life,
    • recover their health,
    • retain or regain their loved ones love,
    • restore earning ability, and
    • avoid conflict with the police

    by helping them get sober?

    . ..

     

    ————————-o————————

    Alcoholics do not generally

    respond to normal help.

     

    —————————o————————-

     

    -

    .

    However, success is possible

    with a strategy that has

    proven results.

    .

    -

    This strategy is known as ‘Brief Twelve Step Facilitation’.

    Brief Twelve Step Facilitation Cover2Brief Twelve Step Facilitation; –

    • is a culmination of scientific research and experience gained over the last 70 years.
    • incorporates elements of cognitive behavioural therapy, motivational interviewing, twelve step facilitation and Alcoholics Anonymous.
    • intervention can be brief (just one hour) with support sessions as needed.
    • can be conducted by anyone who has interviewing or counselling skills
    • is an early intervention to prevent further degeneration
    • is an ultimate harm minimisation strategy

    -

    -.

    ————————o————————

    You can start helping alcoholics for just USD$9.95.

    This e-book manual of 56 pages is in an easy to read language and format.

    ————————-o————————man drinking beer

     

    Alcoholics can get sober with your help or; They may continue drinking, be in denial, become angry, engage in domestic violence, break the law, become estranged, lose a job, get injured or become ill.

    Helpers may be happy to be of help or become disillusioned. What did I do wrong? Why won’t they stop drinking? How can I really help?

    Alcoholics themselves are usually in pain and frustrated. Why can’t I stop drinking? I have tried to get sober! Am I doomed by my drinking?

    .

    Brief Twelve Step Facilitation is suitable for use by;

    • Doctors / Physicians
    • Psychologists
    • Psychiatrists
    • Social Workers
    • Nurses
    • Counsellors
    • Faith Based Therapists (e.g. Pastors, Ministers, Rabbis, Monks, brothers) and
    • Trained volunteers
    • In fact anyone with interviewing skills and a little detachment

    Professionally Written Strategy

    Brief Twelve Step Facilitation is professionally written by Mr Robin Foote who has over 26 years experience working with alcoholics, drug addicts, compulsive gamblers and their families. Mr Foote’s qualifications include Bachelor of Arts (welfare), National Certified Addictions Counsellor and trained Twelve Step Facilitator.

     

    What is alcoholism?

    An alcoholic loses the will to consistently stop drinking when needed or wanted. They will also crave alcohol when not drinking and crave more alcohol even when drinking. They may also be in denial about their drinking and its effects on them.

    Regardless of the moral, medical, psychological or political issues about alcoholism, alcoholics are in dire straights and need appropriate and effective help.

     

    Effective help includes showing them how to;

    • sm_Handshake3develop a deep desire to stop drinking
    • accept responsibility for their health,
    • be a good spouse and/or parent,
    • partake in extended family life,
    • be a good employee or boss,
    • become a good citizen and community minded,
    • Obey and promote the law,

    .

    Obviously you are not responsible for other peoples actions.

    All you can do is point the way to sobriety.

    The Brief Twelve Step Facilitation presenter can do so without becoming frustrated.

    .

    Posted in Alcohol, Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholic, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Brief TSF, Cognitive behavioural, Counsellor, Doctors, Faith Based, Heavy Drinker, Help an Alcoholic, Priests, Ministers, Pastors,, Professional Training, Psychiatrist, Psychologist, Therapist, Twelve Step Facilitation and tagged , , , , , , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

    * * * * *

    Brief Twelve Step Facilitation Model

    The process of intervention in the Brief Twelve Step Facilitation model has several simple elements. These are incorporated in the Objectives, Focus and Actions as shown below.

    Intervention Map

     

    Brief Twelve Step Facilitation

     

    Objective

     

    Focus

     

    Action

     

    Assessment

     

    Detoxification            ð

     

    Treat or Refer

     

    Alcohol Abuse            ð

     

    Brief advice & monitor

     

    Alcohol Dependence    ð

     

    Initiate Brief Twelve Step Facilitation

     

    Primary Goals

     

    o      Introduction to Alcoholics Anonymous

     

    o      Introduction to Peer Sponsor

     

    Facilitate introductions

     

    Primary Strategy

     

    o      Disturb denial

     

    o      Motivate person

     

    Assess alcohol history

     

    Primary Symptoms

     

    o      Denial

     

    o      Loss of Control

     

    Assess alcohol effects

     

    Primary Themes

     

    o      Pragmatism

     

    o      Spirituality

     

    o      Do what ever works

     

    o      Principled motivation and guidance

     

    Process Goals

     

    1.      Acceptance

     

    2.      Surrender

     

    3.      Action

     

    1.      Acceptance of personal alcoholism

     

    2.      Surrender to process of recovery

     

    3.      Take action to sample Alcoholics Anonymous

     

    Copyright © Robin J Foote 2005- 2011

     

    Brief Twelve Step Facilitation.  Help An Alcoholic

    Posted in Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Help an Alcoholic, Twelve Step Facilitation and tagged , , , , . Use this permalink for a bookmark.

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