Brief detection and co-occurrence of violence, depression and alcohol risk in prenatal care settings.

The purpose of the study was to examine the rates and inter-relationships among violence receipt, alcohol use problems, and depression in women seeking prenatal care.

While waiting for their prenatal care appointment, women (n = 1054) completed measures of past year partner and non-partner violence receipt, alcohol misuse (using the TWEAK and quantity and frequency of alcohol use in past year), and depression (using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale – CESD and prior history of depression).

Over 30% of women reported either violence receipt, alcohol use problems or depression risk.

Significant inter-relationships among all measured risk variables were found.

Violence receipt was significantly related to

  • alcohol misuse,
  • cigarette use,
  • less education, and
  • scoring above the cutoff on the CESD (? 16).

Practitioners can be well-equipped to provide assessment, interventions, or referrals as needed to the high numbers of women encountered in prenatal care settings experiencing psychosocial and behavioral problems that may affect their pregnancy.

Research; H. A. Flynn, M. A. Walton, S. T. Chermack, R. M. Cunningham and S. M. Marcus. Brief detection and co-occurrence of violence, depression and alcohol risk in prenatal care settings. Archives of Women’s Mental Health, 1434-1816 (Print) 1435-1102 (Online), Volume 10, Number 4 / August, 2007

Brief-TSF provides guidelines and strategies for using the TWEAK.